Bowood Park as it is believed to have appeared in the mid 18th Century, before landscape architect Lancelot 'Capability' Brown's redesign of this area of the park. 2016.

The reconstruction illustration shows the imagined view looking south from what would be the present-day north end of Bowood Lake, near The Cascades, along the course of the original Whetham Stream, which Brown dammed to create the great lake at Bowood, with the 'Big House' in the background (demolished in the 1950s).

This illustration was commissioned for inclusion in the recently-opened exhibition in The Orangery at Bowood House, entitled 'Terrestrial Delights: 'Capability' Brown and the Bowood Landscape', which is part of 2016's 'Capability' Brown Festival, celebrating the 300th anniversary of the birth of Britain's greatest landscape designer.

 

 

 

Liddington Camp hillfort, Wiltshire, and surrounding landscape, as it may have appeared in the late Iron Age. Created for display at Chiseldon Museum. Acrylic ink on watercolour paper. 2015. 

 

 

Burderop Down field system, Wiltshire, and surrounding landscape, as it may have appeared in the late Iron Age. Created for display at Chiseldon Museum. Acrylic ink on watercolour paper. 2015. 

 


 

Barbury Castle hillfort, Wiltshire, and surrounding landscape, as it may have appeared in the late Iron Age. Created for display at Chiseldon Museum. Acrylic ink on watercolour paper. 2015.

 

 

 

Reconstruction illustrations showing two views of Radholme Deer Park in the Forest of Bowland, Lancashire, as it may have appeared in circa 1500 AD. These reconstructions were commissioned for the 'Leap in the Park' project managed by the Forest of Bowland AONB team, and were included on information panels placed around the landscape. Both illustrations acrylic ink on paper, 2013.

An experimental animated 'pan' through these illustrations can be viewed on the Animations and Interactives page of this website, here.

 

 

 

Reconstruction of Cadbury Camp Hill Fort, North Somerset, in the late Iron Age. This reconstruction was created for an information panel placed at the site, managed by Natural England and the National Trust. The illustration below was commissioned to accompany the reconstruction on web pages, and depicts the view south from Cadbury Camp as it is appears today. Both illustrations acrylic ink on paper, 2014.

 


 

Medieval 'saulter', or deer leap, within Radholme or Leagram Deer Park in the Forest of Bowland, Lancashire, in about 1500. Watercolour & acrylic ink. 2013.

This illustration, along with the following illustrations concerning the medieval deer parks in the Forest of Bowland, were produced for the 'A Leap in the Park' project for the Forest of Bowland Area of Natural Beauty team. The illustrations have been used on information panels in the landscape, on the project website, in interactive media and education resources.

You can visit the website here: http://www.forestofbowland.com/aleapinthepark

 

 

Deer hunting scene, set within Radholme or Leagram Deer Park in the Forest of Bowland, Lancashire, in about 1500. Watercolour & acrylic ink. 2013.

 

Winter feeding of deer within Leagram Deer Park in the Forest of Bowland, Lancashire, in about 1500. Watercolour & acrylic ink. 2013.

 

 

Poachers being caught red-handed by Parkers patrolling the boundaries of the medieval deer park. Early morning winter scene within Radholme Deer Park in the Forest of Bowland, Lancashire, set in about 1500. Watercolour & acrylic ink. 2013.

 

 

The stone boundary wall of Radholme Deer Park in the Forest of Bowland, Lancashire, in about 1500. Watercolour & acrylic ink. 2013. 

 

 

Medieval 'pillow mounds' in a rabbit warren, within Radholme or Leagram Deer Park in the Forest of Bowland, Lancashire, in about 1500. Watercolour & acrylic ink. 2013.

 

 

 

Above are two reconstruction illustrations I created as a part of the new site interpretation for the Saxon Town Wall remains excavated at Oxford Castle.

The upper illustration shows a conjectural view of the Saxon Town Walls at the south side of Oxford in circa 1050, with a view of the landscape to the south-east. The lower illustration shows a conjectural view of buildings and people within the Town Walls in circa 1050, based on excavated evidence and comparable structures. Both illustrations are reproduced on large panels positioned at either side of the remains of the Saxon Wall at Oxford Castle. Watercolour, acrylic ink & pencil on paper, 2013.

I also created two new maps and a section drawing for this commission, based on excavation plans and drawings made by Oxford Archaeology during the excavation of the site. Please see these on the 'Plans & Sections' page.

 

 

 

Reconstruction of the deserted medieval village of Billesley Trussell, near Stratford upon Avon, shown here circa 1370.The illustration shows the view east along the main street, with a moated manor house in the foreground and the Church of All Saints to the left. I also created a detailed plan of the village, please see the 'Plans & Sections' page of this website. Watercolour on paper, 2011.

The reconstruction and the plan will both be included on an information panel at the site, produced in conjunction with the Churches Conservation Trust and Jakaranda Tree Ltd.

 

 

Conjectural reconstruction of a medieval chapel at the St. Mary Magdalene Leper Hospital, Winchester, with a 'cutaway' showing a tomb robbery taking place during the years the hospital was used as a Napoleonic prisoner of war camp. I also made a conjectural detail illustration (below) of the skeletons of an adult and child from the grave in question. These drawings were commissioned to illustrate a hypothesis in an undergraduate dissertation. Pencil on paper, 2010.

 

 

 

 

Reconstruction of a c.1500 English woman, after a drawing by Hans Holbein. The illustration was commissioned to accompany the display of a medieval dress-hook in the Oxfordshire Museum. Dress-hooks were used to left the hem of fashionably long and heavy dresses, in order to keep the fabric out of the dirt. I also made a detail illustration (below) of the dress-hook to accompany the main illustration. Both illustrations are watercolour and pencil on watercolour paper. 2010.

 

 

 


 

Reconstruction of a 1st century AD Romano-British woman having her hair styled using carved bone pins. Watercolour & pencil on watercolour paper. 2009.

The pins and bronze mirror in the painting were based on Roman finds held in the Swindon Museum.


 

 

Reconstruction of Bronze Age hunters on the Thames Flood Plain, Oxfordshire, created to illustrate the use of bronze spear heads found in the area and displayed in the Oxfordshire Museum. Watercolour & crayon on watercolour paper, 2009.

 

 

Visualisation of the deposition of human remains within the first mortuary structure at Wayland's Smithy 1, according to Professor R.J.C. Atkinson's published theory, 1965. Watercolour & crayon on watercolour paper, 2009.

 

 

 

Visualisation of the first timber mortuary structure at Wayland's Smithy 1, according to Professor R.J.C. Atkinson's published theory, 1965. Watercolour & crayon on watercolour paper, 2009.

  

Visualisation of the deposition of human remains within the first mortuary structure at Wayland's Smithy 1, according to Ian Kinnes' published theory, 1975. Watercolour & crayon on watercolour paper, 2009. 

 


Visualisation of the first timber mortuary structure at Wayland's Smithy 1, according to Ian Kinnes' published theory, 1975. Watercolour & crayon on watercolour paper, 2009.

 

Visualisation of the deposition of human remains within the first mortuary structure at Wayland's Smithy 1, according to Alisdair Whittle's published theory, 1991. Watercolour & crayon on watercolour paper, 2009. 

 

Visualisation of the first timber mortuary structure at Wayland's Smithy 1, according to Alisdair Whittle's published theory, 1991. Watercolour & crayon on watercolour paper, 2009.

 

Above is a series of six visualisations of the first mortuary structure at Wayland's Smithy 1, a Neolithic mortuary structure and (later) oval mound located on the Ridgeway near Ashbury in Oxfordshire, UK.

There are three published interpretations of the evidence excavated at the site in the early 1960s; Atkinson's theory (1965), Kinnes' theory (1975) and Whittle's theory (1991).  Each theory has been visualised in a pair of images; one showing the deposition of remains and one showing the form of the mortuary structure, each according to that particular theory.

The images were later incorporated into a series of interactive pages, which can be viewed on this site on the page called 'Wayland's Smithy 1 Interactive'.

 

 

 

 Late 13th Century Man-at-Arms. Gouache on watercolour paper. 2006.

 

 

 Early 14th Century Lady. Gouache on watercolour paper. 2006.

 

 

 14th Century Lady fastening turret annular brooch. Gouache, acrylic & pastel on watercolour paper. 2007. 

 

 

 


 

Visualisation of Maud de Braose & child at Painscastle, Powys, Wales, in 1198. Gouache & crayon on watercolour paper. 2008. 

 

 

Visualisation of the arming of Maud de Braose prior to the siege and Battle of Painscastle, Powys, Wales, in 1198. Gouache & crayon on watercolour paper. 2008.